Browse By Type of Floor

 

The most commonly used engineered hardwood floor is a plywood base where the construction of each board is as the following: 1. Top layer of hardwood 2. Core made out plywood With different collections through the various suppliers, generally the variants are the thicknesses of the top hardwood layer (the thicker the layer increase the ability for re-sanding), and the thickness and type of plywood used. Types of plywood have been seen to vary from fir, to cedar, and the most common and reliable a marine-grade Baltic Birch. 

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SPF Construction

An engineered hardwood flooring construction which is growing in popularity is one made with a core of SPF – a combination of quarter-sawn Spruce, Pine and Fir softwood species. In this type of construction, these species are cut and arrayed into “pickets” which run perpendicular to the direction of the hardwood lamella; thus resisting the natural expansion and contraction of the hardwood lamella.

HDF Core

The final construction we will consider is the one least commonly found; one where the core is made of HDF  (high density fiberboard). HDF is the core material of laminate floors, click-together cork floors, click-together linoleum floors and others. It is also used for hardwood floors where a lower-cost, click-together hardwood is desirable. It is still a real hardwood floor, just one where a hardwood lamella is glued to a HDF base rather than a SPF or plywood base. 

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LAMINATE

Laminate floors are a hybrid floor covering consisting of a particleboard wood base topped by an image layer and a transparent wear layer. Laminate floors are a popular type of floor covering for homes' living areas, kitchens, dining areas, bedrooms, hallways, and other areas that are not subject to excessive moisture.

Laminate floors were invented in 1977 by the Swedish company Perstorp. This firm landed on the idea of using up waste wood projects by subjecting those products to intensely high pressure, heat, and binding chemicals, then turning the result into usable floor coverings. 

 
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Vinyl Sheet

As the title itself, solid hardwood floor is solid hardwood. With the species chosen, whether and oak, maple, hickory, or etc... the floor board will be from top to bottom a chunk of that species. Most generally offered in a 3/4" thickness, and widths varying between 2 1/4" to 4 1/4" as solid hardwoods do not come wider due to its inability to promote the stability of its core as a wider board, solid hardwood can only be either nailed or stapled to a wooden subfloor, as do to its inability for concrete substrates, it then is most predominantly found in households on the levels that offer a wooden subfloor. With its thickness complete of the same speices, it has multiple opportunities to be sand and finished throughout its life cycle.

 

Glue Down/Loose Lay Vinyl 

The most commonly used engineered hardwood floor is a plywood base where the construction of each board is as the following: 1. Top layer of hardwood 2. Core made out plywood With different collections through the various suppliers, generally the variants are the thicknesses of the top hardwood layer (the thicker the layer increase the ability for re-sanding), and the thickness and type of plywood used. Types of plywood have been seen to vary from fir, to cedar, and the most common and reliable a marine-grade Baltic Birch. 

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Vinyl Click

An engineered hardwood flooring construction which is growing in popularity is one made with a core of SPF – a combination of quarter-sawn Spruce, Pine and Fir softwood species. In this type of construction, these species are cut and arrayed into “pickets” which run perpendicular to the direction of the hardwood lamella; thus resisting the natural expansion and contraction of the hardwood lamella.

Groutable Engineered Vinyl Tile

The final construction we will consider is the one least commonly found; one where the core is made of HDF  (high density fiberboard). HDF is the core material of laminate floors, click-together cork floors, click-together linoleum floors and others. It is also used for hardwood floors where a lower-cost, click-together hardwood is desirable. It is still a real hardwood floor, just one where a hardwood lamella is glued to a HDF base rather than a SPF or plywood base. 

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Porcelain

The most common type of tiles, porcelain tiles have the characteristics of low water absorption, dense, durable tiles that can come in an array of finishes, colors and styles, capable of being placed on walls, floors and exterior applications. These Porcelain tiles come in two edge types categorized as Rectified & Non-Rectified. These refer to two types of technologies of construction of pressed porcelain tiles that have rounded edges and vary more greatly in size tolerances between the tiles, and the formed porcelain tiles that run through a final "Squaring off" cut process to make all edges a 90 degree angle and squared off with very minimal tolerance in difference between sizing from one to the next tile. With the Rectified porcelain tiles due to their accurate relations in sizing, allows the ability for much smaller grout lines then Non-rectified porcelain tiles. This is because non-rectified porcelain tiles required larger grout lines to accommodate the differences in sizes between the tiles. Poreclain tiles can come in many formats from small mosaic forms, to larger forms as slabs that will be discussed below in the Large-Format section. 

 
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Ceramic Tile (only for walls)

All tiles beside natural stone are made of a ceramic form, but the largest difference between ceramic tiles and what is known as porcelain tiles, is that ceramic tiles are put in the kiln at a lower temperature resulting in a higher water absorption rating (therefore not capable for exterior applications due to frost) and pressed to form at a less force reducing the durability and resistance to pressure and strikes making it not adequate for floor applications. They are also then glazed over with a digitally printed image and glazed.  itAs still retains the applicable specifications through its constuction to be used in wall settings inside bathtub/shower surrounds, ceramic tiles allow for a wider array of designs that can be afforded to each setting.

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Mosaics

Mosaics are a distinction refering to smaller chip tiles either made up of porcelain, ceramic, glass or natural stone. Mosaic tiles are placed on a sheeting which depending on the material, can be placed in various settings and most commonly used for backsplashes, shower bases, and accent pieces.

Subway Tiles

Subway tiles have forced its own categorization as it is one of the most widely used styles of formats of ceramic, natural stone, or porcelain tiles in many designs. "Subway" in the tile world refers to rectangular tiles where is long edge is larger by a ratio to its short edge and usually refers to tiles smaller then 12"x24".

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Porcelain Slabs

Slabs of the construction of porcelain refer to porcelain tiles larger then the sizes of 24"x48" reaching up to as big as 5'x10'. These slabs due to their porcelain nature have all the qualities of a smaller size porcelain tile, but due to its size are commonly thinner and require an extended experience and training to cut, install and handle.

Natural Stone

Referring to any natural material extracted from the earth and cut to size, natural stone spreads to categorize the many wonders of the rocky extracts like slate, marble, quartzite, and many others, Due to its natural qualities, most commonly all natural stones have a specific guideline for handling, installation, and preventative maintenance like sealing the surfaces to achieve a formidable and proper installation.

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Nylon

The most common type of tiles, porcelain tiles have the characteristics of low water absorption, dense, durable tiles that can come in an array of finishes, colors and styles, capable of being placed on walls, floors and exterior applications. These Porcelain tiles come in two edge types categorized as Rectified & Non-Rectified. These refer to two types of technologies of construction of pressed porcelain tiles that have rounded edges and vary more greatly in size tolerances between the tiles, and the formed porcelain tiles that run through a final "Squaring off" cut process to make all edges a 90 degree angle and squared off with very minimal tolerance in difference between sizing from one to the next tile. With the Rectified porcelain tiles due to their accurate relations in sizing, allows the ability for much smaller grout lines then Non-rectified porcelain tiles. This is because non-rectified porcelain tiles required larger grout lines to accommodate the differences in sizes between the tiles. Poreclain tiles can come in many formats from small mosaic forms, to larger forms as slabs that will be discussed below in the Large-Format section. 

Wool

All tiles beside natural stone are made of a ceramic form, but the largest difference between ceramic tiles and what is known as porcelain tiles, is that ceramic tiles are put in the kiln at a lower temperature resulting in a higher water absorption rating (therefore not capable for exterior applications due to frost) and pressed to form at a less force reducing the durability and resistance to pressure and strikes making it not adequate for floor applications. They are also then glazed over with a digitally printed image and glazed.  itAs still retains the applicable specifications through its constuction to be used in wall settings inside bathtub/shower surrounds, ceramic tiles allow for a wider array of designs that can be afforded to each setting.

Olefin (Polypropelene Fibre)

The most common type of tiles, porcelain tiles have the characteristics of low water absorption, dense, durable tiles that can come in an array of finishes, colors and styles, capable of being placed on walls, floors and exterior applications. These Porcelain tiles come in two edge types categorized as Rectified & Non-Rectified. These refer to two types of technologies of construction of pressed porcelain tiles that have rounded edges and vary more greatly in size tolerances between the tiles, and the formed porcelain tiles that run through a final "Squaring off" cut process to make all edges a 90 degree angle and squared off with very minimal tolerance in difference between sizing from one to the next tile. With the Rectified porcelain tiles due to their accurate relations in sizing, allows the ability for much smaller grout lines then Non-rectified porcelain tiles. This is because non-rectified porcelain tiles required larger grout lines to accommodate the differences in sizes between the tiles. Poreclain tiles can come in many formats from small mosaic forms, to larger forms as slabs that will be discussed below in the Large-Format section. 

Textured

The most common type of tiles, porcelain tiles have the characteristics of low water absorption, dense, durable tiles that can come in an array of finishes, colors and styles, capable of being placed on walls, floors and exterior applications. These Porcelain tiles come in two edge types categorized as Rectified & Non-Rectified. These refer to two types of technologies of construction of pressed porcelain tiles that have rounded edges and vary more greatly in size tolerances between the tiles, and the formed porcelain tiles that run through a final "Squaring off" cut process to make all edges a 90 degree angle and squared off with very minimal tolerance in difference between sizing from one to the next tile. With the Rectified porcelain tiles due to their accurate relations in sizing, allows the ability for much smaller grout lines then Non-rectified porcelain tiles. This is because non-rectified porcelain tiles required larger grout lines to accommodate the differences in sizes between the tiles. Poreclain tiles can come in many formats from small mosaic forms, to larger forms as slabs that will be discussed below in the Large-Format section. 

Saxony

The most common type of tiles, porcelain tiles have the characteristics of low water absorption, dense, durable tiles that can come in an array of finishes, colors and styles, capable of being placed on walls, floors and exterior applications. These Porcelain tiles come in two edge types categorized as Rectified & Non-Rectified. These refer to two types of technologies of construction of pressed porcelain tiles that have rounded edges and vary more greatly in size tolerances between the tiles, and the formed porcelain tiles that run through a final "Squaring off" cut process to make all edges a 90 degree angle and squared off with very minimal tolerance in difference between sizing from one to the next tile. With the Rectified porcelain tiles due to their accurate relations in sizing, allows the ability for much smaller grout lines then Non-rectified porcelain tiles. This is because non-rectified porcelain tiles required larger grout lines to accommodate the differences in sizes between the tiles. Poreclain tiles can come in many formats from small mosaic forms, to larger forms as slabs that will be discussed below in the Large-Format section. 

Frieze

The most common type of tiles, porcelain tiles have the characteristics of low water absorption, dense, durable tiles that can come in an array of finishes, colors and styles, capable of being placed on walls, floors and exterior applications. These Porcelain tiles come in two edge types categorized as Rectified & Non-Rectified. These refer to two types of technologies of construction of pressed porcelain tiles that have rounded edges and vary more greatly in size tolerances between the tiles, and the formed porcelain tiles that run through a final "Squaring off" cut process to make all edges a 90 degree angle and squared off with very minimal tolerance in difference between sizing from one to the next tile. With the Rectified porcelain tiles due to their accurate relations in sizing, allows the ability for much smaller grout lines then Non-rectified porcelain tiles. This is because non-rectified porcelain tiles required larger grout lines to accommodate the differences in sizes between the tiles. Poreclain tiles can come in many formats from small mosaic forms, to larger forms as slabs that will be discussed below in the Large-Format section. 

Cable

The most common type of tiles, porcelain tiles have the characteristics of low water absorption, dense, durable tiles that can come in an array of finishes, colors and styles, capable of being placed on walls, floors and exterior applications. These Porcelain tiles come in two edge types categorized as Rectified & Non-Rectified. These refer to two types of technologies of construction of pressed porcelain tiles that have rounded edges and vary more greatly in size tolerances between the tiles, and the formed porcelain tiles that run through a final "Squaring off" cut process to make all edges a 90 degree angle and squared off with very minimal tolerance in difference between sizing from one to the next tile. With the Rectified porcelain tiles due to their accurate relations in sizing, allows the ability for much smaller grout lines then Non-rectified porcelain tiles. This is because non-rectified porcelain tiles required larger grout lines to accommodate the differences in sizes between the tiles. Poreclain tiles can come in many formats from small mosaic forms, to larger forms as slabs that will be discussed below in the Large-Format section. 

Looped

The most common type of tiles, porcelain tiles have the characteristics of low water absorption, dense, durable tiles that can come in an array of finishes, colors and styles, capable of being placed on walls, floors and exterior applications. These Porcelain tiles come in two edge types categorized as Rectified & Non-Rectified. These refer to two types of technologies of construction of pressed porcelain tiles that have rounded edges and vary more greatly in size tolerances between the tiles, and the formed porcelain tiles that run through a final "Squaring off" cut process to make all edges a 90 degree angle and squared off with very minimal tolerance in difference between sizing from one to the next tile. With the Rectified porcelain tiles due to their accurate relations in sizing, allows the ability for much smaller grout lines then Non-rectified porcelain tiles. This is because non-rectified porcelain tiles required larger grout lines to accommodate the differences in sizes between the tiles. Poreclain tiles can come in many formats from small mosaic forms, to larger forms as slabs that will be discussed below in the Large-Format section. 

Cable

The most common type of tiles, porcelain tiles have the characteristics of low water absorption, dense, durable tiles that can come in an array of finishes, colors and styles, capable of being placed on walls, floors and exterior applications. These Porcelain tiles come in two edge types categorized as Rectified & Non-Rectified. These refer to two types of technologies of construction of pressed porcelain tiles that have rounded edges and vary more greatly in size tolerances between the tiles, and the formed porcelain tiles that run through a final "Squaring off" cut process to make all edges a 90 degree angle and squared off with very minimal tolerance in difference between sizing from one to the next tile. With the Rectified porcelain tiles due to their accurate relations in sizing, allows the ability for much smaller grout lines then Non-rectified porcelain tiles. This is because non-rectified porcelain tiles required larger grout lines to accommodate the differences in sizes between the tiles. Poreclain tiles can come in many formats from small mosaic forms, to larger forms as slabs that will be discussed below in the Large-Format section.